The Believer and Indwelling Sin 

“For we know that the Law is spiritual; but I am of flesh, sold into bondage to sin. For that which I am doing, I do not understand; for I am not practicing what I would like to do, but I am doing the very thing I hate. But if I do the very thing I do not wish to do, I agree with the Law, confessing that it is good. So now, no longer am I the one doing it, but sin which indwells me” (Romans 7:14-17).
Believers have been freed from sin’s power, but not from its presence.
Romans 7:14-25 is perhaps the most autobiographical passage in all of Scripture. In this poignant account Paul describes in vivid, striking language his battle with indwelling sin. So powerful is that language that some believe it refers to Paul’s life before his conversion. But the apostle describes himself as one who seeks to obey God’s law and who hates evil (vv. 15, 19, 21), who is humble and broken over his sin (v. 18), and who acknowledges Jesus Christ as Lord and serves Him with his mind (v. 25). None of those things characterize an unbeliever. Read more…


The Differences Between Israel & the Church…Yes it Matters!

The Differences Between Israel & the Church…Yes it Matters!
Here are a few (or a little more than a few) differences between Israel and the Church that we easily find in Scripture when we rightly divide the text of the Bible. This is important to understand, for a failure to do so may lead us to except the faulty views of replacement theology. What’s that? well…here is a quick definition that should help:
 
Replacement theology (also known as supersessionism) essentially teaches that the church has replaced Israel in God’s plan. Adherents of replacement theology believe the Jews are no longer God’s chosen people, and God does not have specific future plans for the nation of Israel. Among the different views of the relationship between the church and Israel are the church has replaced Israel (replacement theology), the church is an expansion of Israel (covenant theology), or the church is completely different and distinct from Israel (dispensationalism/premillennialism).

Replacement theology teaches that the church is the replacement for Israel and that the many promises made to Israel in the Bible are fulfilled in the Christian church, not in Israel (from Got Questions here).

 
We will look into this more in the days ahead, but here is the chart that will help you see the differences between the church and Israel.
 


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